Gene Balfour Blogs

Introduction

Every human being shares one common motivation – the need to survive.

“Survival” means different things to different people at different times in their lives, and human motivations shift accordingly.  I will show how “survival” perception affects political opinion.

In 1943, Abraham Maslow published  "A Theory of Human Motivation". In this paper [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs] he outlines his ideas concerning human motivations at 5 different levels of human need (see diagram below). Notice that Marlow’s hierarchy encompasses physical (“physiological”) needs as well as those of a social and psychological nature, and that the physiological needs serve as a prerequisite for fulfillment before a person will pursue the 4 higher order needs for Security, Love/belonging, Esteem and Self-actualization.  Dr. Maslow’s paper underpins my ideas presented in this article.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

At any point in a person’s life, ability to “survive” is influenced by many factors – both inherited as well as unforeseen circumstances. Lessons learned up to any point in life can also influence survivability perceptions, and they can apply at any level of Maslow’s hierarchy.

It is this aspect of individuals’ perceived survival prospects that attracts my interest. In particular, I am interested in understanding how one’s Life Lens (to be explained later) affects his or her political choices, and also how politicians are able to win votes with appropriately prepared campaign platforms and strategies.

 

A reminder of the core Libertarian principles …..

Principle 1: Libertarians defend Individual Property Rights (IPR) whereby "property" refers to each person's:

  • Body
  • Mind
  • Effort
  • Assets (earned or acquired through trade)

Principle 2: Do No Harm. The 3 types of action that can inflict harm on others are described in the Non-Aggression Principle (NAP) - an ethical stance that asserts that all forms of aggression are inherently illegitimate. The NAP forbids any human action that serves to intentionally inflict...

  • Physical harm upon the Body of other person(s)
  • Threat of physical harm and/or restrictions on the use of one’s Mind to make otherwise viable choices that may benefit one’s person or personal communities (family members for example.)
  • Survival harm to other person(s) perpetrated through acts of theft or deception which serve to deprive the victim(s) of their earned Assets and/or their legitimate Efforts to provide for their needs, wants, safety or security.

Education regulations & Libertarian principles

The Education Act, R.S.O.1990, c. E.2 is analyzed under the Libertarian IPR and NAP policy lens to determine if it complies with our principles. This Act empowers the reigning Ontario Liberal Party to operate expensive, inflexible, ideologically biased, self-serving and harmful education monopolies.  For more about the Education Act, please refer to the https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/90e02.

Please note that the Education Act contains 347 topics under 9 PARTS (sections). Among other things, these prescribe too many rules of conduct and remedial procedures to address in this Bulletin. Instead, I shall not assess any individual topic or PART, but the entire nature of the Education Act as a non-elective, “one-size-fits-all” program imposed legally on all taxpayers. 

The use of square brackets [ ] will be used to signify the [property element] that is in play for the Analysis.

THE ANALYSIS

A.     Libertarians apply the Individual Property Rights (IPR) principle to identify the property elements that are traded between vendor and customer in order to consummate their economic transactions.

Electricity regulations & Libertarian principles

In this bulletin, the Green Energy Act (GEA) is analyzed under the Libertarian IPR and NAP policy lens to determine if it complies with our principles. This Act empowers the reigning Ontario Liberal Party to operate expensive and harmful energy monopolies. For more about the GEA, please refer to the http://www.energy.gov.on.ca/en/green-energy-act/.

The use of square brackets [ ] will be used to signify the [property element] that is in play for the Analysis.

THE ANALYSIS

A. Libertarians apply the principle of protecting Individual Property Rights (IPR) to identify which of their legitimate property elements are traded between vendor and customer in order to consummate a mutually agreeable economic transaction between them.

Labour regulations & Libertarian principles

In this bulletin, common labour regulations that empower labour unions are analyzed under the IPR and NAP policy lens to determine if they comply. Specifically,

  • The Rand Formula, created in 1945, is a feature of Canadian labour law requiring workers that are covered by collective bargaining contracts to pay union dues – whether or not those workers are union members. (https://cupe.ca/fact-sheet-union-dues-and-rand-formula)
  • Collective bargaining is a process of negotiation between employers and a group of employees aimed at agreements to regulate working salaries, working conditions, benefits, and other aspects of workers' compensation and rights.
  • In Canada, rates in unionization have declined in general, and in 2012, Public Sector rates remained above 71% while Private Sector rates were about 16%. Women tended to seek union membership slightly more often that men (31.3 vs 28.5%) and older workers of both sexes tended to work under union contracts nearly twice as often as younger workers. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2013001/article/11878-eng.htm

THE ANALYSIS

A. Libertarians employ the principle of protecting Individual Property Rights (IPR) to identify which of their legitimate property elements are traded between employer and employee in reaching a mutually agreeable employment arrangement.

It’s the principles that matter!

As a Libertarian and an active member of the Ontario Libertarian Party, it is my objective to help people who are new to Libertarianism to better understand its core principles, why they matter, and how to apply them for the purpose of policy analysis and discourse with other people.

This is the first of a series of bulletins that will address some topics that are important to me personally, as well as all topics that are listed here: 2018 Ontario Libertarian Party Platform.

Introduction

What are the fundamental principles of Libertarianism and why do they matter?

In a nutshell, Libertarians oppose the use of FORCE to aggress against the 'property' of others for personal gain. The one exception is in cases of self-defense.

What do we mean by "property" and "property rights"?

Principle 1: Libertarians defend Individual Property Rights (IPR) whereby "property" refers to each person's:

  • Body
  • Mind
  • Effort
  • Assets (earned or acquired through trade)

Principle 2: Do No Harm. The 3 types of action that can inflict harm on others are described in the Non-Aggression Principle (NAP) - an ethical stance that asserts that all forms of aggression are inherently illegitimate. The NAP forbids any human action that serves to intentionally inflict...

  • Physical harm upon the Body of other person(s)
  • Psychological harm upon the Mind of other person(s) by threats or intimidation that induces fear and places the victim(s) at any disadvantage.
  • Survival harm to other person(s) perpetrated through acts of theft or deception which serve to deprive the victim(s) of their earned Assets and/or their legitimate Efforts to provide for their needs, wants, safety or security.

IMPORTANT: The views or opinions expressed on this site are those of individual authors and contributors and DO NOT necessarily reflect or correspond to the policy or platform of the Ontario Libertarian Party, its leader, or any other party member. This site is moderated and should you have any concerns with anything found herein please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.