Scott Marshall Blogs

Introduction

A few sure signs of spring's arrival in Ontario are migrating birds returning, trees beginning to bud, daylight is sticking around a bit longer and the warming glow of more sunshine. Speaking of sunshine, March 31st also marks the return of our annual glimpse of how the Provincial Government's employees (and others paid with tax dollars) fared during the last calendar year, this time for 2016.

As many of you would know, the annual Sunshine List is a report of everyone earning $100k a year on the Ontario taxpayer's dime.  First introduced by the Harris government back in 1996 it has become an annual beacon for those wanting to see how the public sector is being treated. I've seen it reported that in today's dollars the cutoff should have been raised to about $150k but the truth is that $100 grand is still a pretty good wage and by maintaining the same disclosure you are able to shake your head even more at some of the positions that are able to earn this kind of money.  A bit more on this later in this series.

Before I go any further, it's important to note that my observations and criticisms are not directed at individuals in particular although names do accompany the facts and there may be a few exceptions depending on circumstances. You can hardly blame the individual who manages to find a job that pays them far more than a comparable position in the private sector would.

No, my only intention is to illustrate the history of poor fiscal and general management of government in general, the unfair influence public sector unions have on the taxpayer's purse and the downright malfeasance that rears it's undeniable ugly head from time to time.

Methodology

So right off the hop I'll admit, I'm no expert in data mining or advanced statistical analysis but that said I can read and definitely do some basic math. I'll be applying a bit of the age old theory of common sense to many of my conclusions and in the absence of evidence to the contrary will simply speak to what any particular situation seems to be indicating to me personally.  If you agree ... great, if not ... be sure to set me straight.

For this exercise, I'm going to compare the past three disclosure periods 2016, 2015 and 2014 of salaries plus taxable benefits to find total compensation.  I'm generally going to compare individuals holding the same or similar positions during this period and try to interpret what the numbers are telling me. Also, I'll be primarily focusing on those who earn upwards of $300k per year and above.  The various chapters in this series will be based on Sectors as they are disclosed by the government with some being grouped together such as Colleges and Universities.  The sectors are as follows:

  • Crown Agencies
  • Ministries
  • Legislative Assembly
  • Public Sector
  • Judiciary
  • Hospitals and Boards of Public Health
  • Ontario Power Generation (including some data from the previously disclosed Hydro One)
  • Education and School Boards
  • and finally Municipalities

By the end of this little exercise I'm hoping to shed a little light on a few of the glaring problems that exist and perhaps offer some solutions based on my Libertarian political beliefs.  Some may already be endorsed and promoted by the Ontario Libertarian Party, others will just be my personal take on the topic.

Sunshine Part I - Crown Agencies ... coming soon (like or follow my FB page for announcements)

Thank you for visiting and please if you have any questions, comments or whatnot ... I welcome your feedback.

Cheers!

Scott Marshall
Independent Blogger and Member/Former Candidate, Ontario Libertarian Party

 

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